I Have This Thing Called Autism

Fourth-grader George Yionoulis made a video to help his classmates understand “why he does the things he does” because of his autism. The video is a compilation of photos and videos of George through the years, accompanied by a soundtrack of music he created.

“Let me tell you a little about myself. I have fun dancing, I have fun making music, I love to draw and make art, anddddd… wait for it… I have this thing called autism.”

George goes on to explain many of the things he might do in a given situation and why. He also talks about the tools (gum, headphones, focus) that he uses to help himself. The video is a wonderfully clear and honest look at George’s autism (His mom is quick to point out that, “This is just his own experience, and should not be taken as a blanket explanation of autism.”), and he invites his classmates to feel free to always ask him if they have a question about why he does something the way he does.

Although George didn’t talk until he was 3 years old, he’s got a lot to say now, and the video showcases both his talent and his sense of humor.

The Love of a Dad

Omar’s son, Spenny, may be blind and autistic, but he doesn’t let that stop them from having some fun in his sports car. Who do you think is having a better time?

Life With Autism: Richard Mylan & His Son, Jaco

Welch actor, Richard Mylan, talks about raising his autistic son, Jaco, in a recent BBC documentary.

They’ve both come a long way since Jaco’s diagnosis. Richard, who didn’t want to talk about it at first then found that when he did talk about it, nobody really understood. People thought he was in denial, and even deluded, about his expectations for Jaco. But Richard believes you can’t put a limit on a child, and especially a child with special needs.

And he’s learned to just let Jaco be, to talk if he wants to talk, to just exist quietly if he doesn’t want to talk. “All I needed to do was work out what life on his terms was, and live it with him.” Watch below.

She Has Non-Verbal Autism, But Her New Friend Understands Her Just Fine

If you have a non-verbal child, chances are you know how hard it is for them to make friends. That’s why we know you’ll love this video.

The mother of Carly Jade, a 6th grader with non-verbal autism, took the video at a local Chuck E. Cheese after she saw the way that Carly Jade interacted with her new friend, Zoe. Zoe is neurotypical, but seems to have figured Carly Jade out. As Shannon, Carly Jade’s mom, explained in her Facebook post:

Our daughter Carly Jade, is in sixth grade and is nonverbal, but like every little girl her age, she wants friends and to be accepted, but because of her special needs, she’s often overlooked… Carly may not be able to speak her mind but she definitely shows her feelings with gestures and sounds, she also hears and understands what is said around her..

So when we learned of a classmate, named Zoe, who took Carly under her wings, we were more than overjoyed!

We share this video to show everyone just how important it is to treat everyone equal… and how it captures what words cannot describe.

We’ll let this wonderful video speak for itself:

Our daughter Carly Jade, is in sixth grade and is nonverbal, but like every little girl her age, she wants friends and to be accepted, but because of her special needs, she's often overlooked… Carly may not be able to speak her mind but she definitely shows her feelings with gestures and sounds, she also hears and understands what is said around her.. So when we learned of a classmate, named Zoe, who took Carly under her wings, we were more than overjoyed! We share this video to show everyone just how important it is to treat everyone equal… and how it captures what words cannot describe.

Posted by Shannon Sommers on Tuesday, May 23, 2017